Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is a broad field of endeavor with opportunities in many areas of industry: production and manufacturing; aeronautics and aerospace; robotics and automation; conventional and renewable energy; automotive and transportation; and many others. Additional opportunities for mechanical engineers include careers in government, education, and private consulting. The mechanical engineering curriculum is designed to prepare students for this wide range of options by providing them with a strong foundation in the fundamental principles of science and engineering to tackle the complex technological problems of today and adapt for the challenges of tomorrow.

The required courses of the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum provide the basic mathematical and scientific fundamentals underlying the practice of mechanical engineering. Technical, free, and math/science elective courses allow the student flexibility in adapting the program to their interests in pursuit of their specific career goals. Electives in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts help to foster the links between society and engineering so that the mechanical engineering graduate is aware of the roles of engineering and science in solving complex technological and social problems as well as of the impacts of social and environmental factors on engineering activities such as design. For those undergraduates who choose to continue their education at Rose-Hulman, graduate work leading to a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering or a Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering is offered by the department.

Mission: To provide the curriculum, the educational environment, and the individual support necessary to graduate mechanical engineers who are technically competent, effective in practice, creative, ethical, and mindful of their responsibility to society.

Vision: To graduate the best baccalaureate mechanical engineers.

 

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives and Student Outcomes

Program Educational Objectives

The mechanical engineering curriculum aims to prepare students for productive careers in industry, government, education, and private consulting, as well as for graduate study. By providing a strong foundation in the fundamental principles of science and engineering and by illuminating the links between society and engineering, the curriculum enables students to apply what they have learned and to teach themselves new skills to address complex technological problems within the social and environmental context of our world. Thus, within a few years of graduation, we expect our graduates to attain the following educational objectives, which are based on the needs of our constituencies:

  1. Our alumni will be successful in their careers.
  2. Our alumni set and meet their own goals for career fulfillment.
  3. Our alumni will continue professional development.
  4. Our alumni will be cognizant of the international dimensions of their profession.

Student Outcomes

Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program. We expect our graduates to have the ability to:

  1. Identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. Apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. Function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. Develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusion.
  7. Acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

The mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, https://www.abet.org, under the commission’s General Criteria and Program Criteria for Mechanical and Similarly Named Engineering Programs.

Summary of degree requirements

The freshman year of the mechanical engineering program includes courses in mathematics and foundational sciences, as well as introductory courses in engineering and design. Foundational sciences include physics, biology, and chemistry. The sophomore year features courses in mathematics, foundational sciences, and the engineering sciences. The final two years of the program stress the design and analysis of systems, machines and their components, and the transfer and transformation of energy. In addition to the required mathematics, science, and engineering courses, the program includes required writing and communication courses and an array of technical electives and free electives, a math/science elective, and elective courses in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts (HSSA). The requirements for an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering are summarized in the following table:

Category

Credits

Required engineering (ME, ES, EM) courses

86

Required math courses

27

Required foundational science courses

16

Required HSSA writing and communication courses

8

Required RHIT 100 course

1

Technical electives

16

Free electives

8

Math/science elective

4

HSSA electives

28

Total

194

 

Minor in Manufacturing Engineering 

The goal of this minor is to provide interested students with an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of the methods, processes and technologies related to the analysis and design of manufacturing systems.  

At the completion of this minor, students will be able to: 

  1. Describe methods, processes and /or technologies used in manufacturing.
  2. Identify, formulate, and solve problems in the area of manufacturing.
  3. Analyze and design manufacturing technologies and systems within reasonable constraints such as economic, manufacturability, sustainability and environmental by applying appropriate theories and methods.
  4. Communicate effectively about manufacturing engineering problem solutions, technologies, and system designs.
  5. Describe interactions between humans and systems in the workplace.

Requirements 

To earn the Minor in Manufacturing Engineering, a student must complete 28 credit hours according to the guidelines shown below.  

Core Course (4 credits) 

Select one from the following list of two courses: 

  • ME 317 Design for Manufacturing or 
  • EngD 260 Product Design Studio

Manufacturing Electives (16-20 credits) 

Select 16 - 20 credit hours (4-5 courses) from the following list of manufacturing elective courses: 

  • EMGT 330 Introduction to Engineering Management
  • EMGT 524 Production/Operations Management 
  • EMGT 427 Project Management
  • EMGT 445 Quality Methods
  • EMGT 446 Statistical Methods in Six Sigma
  • EMGT 588 Quality Management
  • EMGT 589 Manufacturing Systems
  • EMGT 570 Lean Six Sigma
  • ME 412 Lean Manufacturing
  • ME 435 Robotics
  • ME 517 Mechanics of Metal Forming
  • ME 520 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing
  • EMGT 538 Product Realization 
  • EMGT 540 Human Factors 
  • EMGT 541 Work Analysis and Design 
  • EM 304 Advanced CAD – Professional Certification
  • EM 305 Advanced CAD – Parametric and Equation Driven Design

HSSA Electives (4-8 credits) 

Select 4 - 8 credit hours (1-2 courses) from the following HSSA courses: 

  • ECON S151 Introduction to Microeconomics 
  • ECON S152 Introduction to Macroeconomics
  • PSYC S100 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSYC S220 Social Psychology
  • ECON S253 Managerial Economics
  • ECON S352 Corporate Finance

Minor in Thermal-Fluids*

To complete the requirements of the Minor in Thermal-Fluids, a student must fulfill the following three expectations:

(1) Completion of a set of 2 courses covering basic fluid mechanics and basic thermodynamics. These are commonly required for most engineering majors. Acceptable sets include:

  • ES 201 Conservation & Accounting Principles
    ES 212 Fluid Systems
    or
  • CE 205 Thermodynamics
    EM 301 Fluid Mechanics
    or
  • CHE 201 Conservation Principles & Balances
    CHE 301 Fluid Mechanics

(2) One of the following foundational prerequisites.

  • ME 301 Applications of Thermodynamics
  • CHE 303 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
  • ME 302 Heat Transfer
  • CHE 320 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer

(3) Three of the thermal-fluids electives listed below.
Thermal-Fluid Systems

  • ME 408 Renewable Energy
  • ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
  • ME 411 Propulsion Systems
  • ME 426 Turbomachinery

Thermal-Fluid Sciences

  • ME 401 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics
  • ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
  • ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • ME 450 Combustion
  • ME 510 Gas Dynamics

Successful completion of a minor is indicated on the student's transcript. A student interested in pursuing the Minor in Thermal-Fluids should consult with the head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
____________________________
* ME Majors do not qualify for the Minor in Thermal-Fluids, but may pursue ME areas of concentration.

Areas of Concentration

Students who complete recommended courses in an area of concentration may receive, upon request, a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the selected area of concentration in the Mechanical Engineering Department. With proper planning, students should be able to take these course offerings without overload. Students may add special topics courses or new courses not yet listed in the catalog to the list of acceptable courses for a concentration with written permission from the mechanical engineering department head.

Automotive Area of Concentration 
Automotive Engineering is a very broad field covering many topics including system modeling, combustion, electrification, autonomous driving, materials, and virtual design. To help prepare for a career in this field, the Automotive Concentration is offered. One required and four elective courses are necessary, allowing students to gain either breadth or depth according to their interests. 

Required Course: 

  • ME 359 Vehicle System Modeling

Elective Courses (choose any four): 

  • CSSE 461 Computer Vision
  • CSSE 463 Image Recognition
  • EM 402 Three Dimensional Dynamics
  • EM 403 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
  • MA 416 Deep Learning
  • ME 401 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics
  • ME 406 Control Systems
  • ME 408 Renewable Energy
  • ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
  • ME 422 Finite Elements for Engineering Applications
  • ME 423 Fatigue
  • ME 424 Mechanics of Composites
  • ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • ME 450 Combustion
  • ME 506 Advanced Control Systems
  • ME 522 Advanced Finite Element Analysis
  • OE 450 Laser Systems & Applications
  • PH 470 Automotive Lighting

Aerospace Engineering Area of Concentration
The aerospace industry provides job opportunities each year for many mechanical engineering graduates. The aerospace engineering area of concentration is intended to provide specialty courses which focus the application of basic mechanical engineering skills to aerospace systems.

The courses required to complete the concentration are as follows:

  • ME 305 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering
  • Plus any 4 of the following:
    • ME 401 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics
    • ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
    • ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
    • ME 411 Propulsion Systems
    • ME 422 Finite Elements for Engineering Applications
    • ME 426 Turbomachinery
    • ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
    • ME 461 Aerospace Design
    • ME 510 Gas Dynamics
    • ME 522 Advanced Finite Element Analysis
    • EM 402 Three-Dimensional Dynamics
    • EM 403 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
    • MA 336 Boundary Value Problems
    • MA 438 Advanced Engineering Mathematics
    • PH 322 Celestial Mechanics

CAD Area of Concentration
The CAD Concentration is intended to prepare students for careers with a focus in computer-aided design and analysis.  The Concentration is divided into two sets of courses: Design and Analysis.  The Design courses provide students with expertise in the use of modern Computer-Aided Design tools to model three-dimensional shapes and to communicate these designs graphically.  The Analysis courses explore the mathematics behind modern CAD tools, giving students a solid background in computer-aided kinematics and finite element analysis.

To earn the CAD Concentration, students must complete the following three Design classes: 

  • EM104 Graphical Communication or ENGD100 Design and Communication Studio or BE118 Design Thinking and Communication
  • EM304 Advanced CAD – Professional Certification
  • EM305 Advanced CAD – Parametric and Equation Driven Design

In addition, students must choose three Analysis courses from the following list 

  • ME422 Finite Elements for Engineering Applications
  • ME522 Advanced Finite Element Analysis
  • ME304 Introduction to the Design of Mechanisms
  • ME404 Advanced Design of Mechanisms 
  • ME480 Machine Component Design (for non-ME majors)

Dynamic Systems & Control Area of Concentration
Mechanical engineering graduates may work in industries, such as the automotive and aerospace industries, in which the understanding and control of a system’s dynamic response is critical.  The dynamic systems & control concentration provides students with experiences in modeling, analysis, and simulation of the dynamic behavior of systems with and without feedback control, as well as opportunities to explore data collection for vibratory systems and control algorithm implementation in a laboratory setting.

To complete the requirements of the area of concentration in Dynamics Systems & Control, students must complete five courses from this list:

  • EM 402 Three-Dimensional Dynamics
  • EM 406 Vibration Analysis
  • EM 502 Advanced Dynamics
  • EM 503 Advanced Vibration Analysis
  • ME 304 Introduction to the Design of Mechanisms
  • ME 404 Advanced Design of Mechanisms
  • ME 406 Control Systems
  • ME 441 Advanced Modeling and Simulation Techniques
  • ME 445 Robot Dynamics and Control
  • ME 506 Advanced Control Systems
  • PH 322 Celestial Mechanics

Thermal Fluid Area of Concentration
The Thermal Fluid concentration is designed to prepare students for careers with a focus on thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. The concentration comprises two balanced areas of study: thermal fluid systems (with an emphasis on applications) and thermal fluid sciences (with an emphasis on fundamentals). They equip students with astrong foundation to analyze and design thermal fluid systems. Emerging global challenges such as climate change, sustainable energy, and water resources call for creative solutions within the constraints of fundamental physical principles. The Thermal Fluid concentration plays an active and crucial role in the broad discipline of mechanical engineering.

To complete the requirements of the area of concentration in Thermal Fluid, students must complete:

  • ME 401 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics

and 4 more courses from the following two areas (with at least one course from each area):

Area 1: Thermal Fluid Systems

  • ME 408 Renewable Energy
  • ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
  • ME 411 Propulsion Systems
  • ME 426 Turbomachinery

Area 2: Thermal Fluid Sciences

  • ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
  • ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • ME 450 Combustion
  • ME 510 Gas Dynamics

Minor in Mechanical Engineering 

The goal of the minor in Mechanical Engineering is to give students a broad understanding of mechanical engineering beyond what would normally be obtained in and denoted by their major. The minor consists of required and elective courses, totaling 26 or 28 credits depending on the student’s major. The distribution of required and elective courses also depends on the student’s major, as detailed in the lists below. Students with more than one major should consult the ME department head to create an appropriate ME minor. 

Elective courses must be selected from approved required or elective courses with an ME/ES/EM prefix taught by the ME faculty. These elective courses must be listed explicitly on the minor declaration form for approval BEFORE completing the courses. Guidance on what might constitute acceptable and unacceptable courses for the minor is available on the ME advising resources page on my.rose-hulman.edu. There is no guarantee that courses completed before formal declaration and approval will count towards the minor. 

 

ME Minor for Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering students (26 credits total) 

Required: EM104, EM121, ES201, ES212 or ES214, ME317
Electives: 8 credits
Not Allowed: ME123, EM103, ME430, ME406 

 

ME Minor for Mathematics, Biomathematics, Biology, Computer Science, or Software Engineering students (28 credits total) 

Required: EM104, EM103, EM121, ES201, ES212 or ES214, ME317
Electives: 8 credits
Not Allowed: ME123
Note that Biology students must select “math sequence 2 – modeling focus” as their math sequence 

 

ME Minor for Chemistry students and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology students (28 credits total) 

Required: EM104, EM103, EM121, ME123, ES201, ES212 or ES214, ME317
Electives: 4 credits
Not allowed: None  

 

ME Minor for Chemical Engineering students (26 credits total) 

Required: EM104, EM121, ES214, ME317
Electives: 12 credits
Not Allowed: ME123, EM103, ES201, ME406  

 

ME Minor for Civil Engineering students (26 credits total) 

Required: EM104, ME123, ME317
Electives: 16 credits
Not Allowed: EM121, EM103, ES201, ES212, ES214, EM204  

 

ME Minor for Engineering Design and Biomedical Engineering students (28 credits total) 

Required: ES212, ES214, ES205
Electives: 16 credits
Not Allowed: EM104, EM121, ME123, EM103, ES201, EM204, ME317  

 

ME Minor for Optical Engineering and Engineering Physics students (28 credits total) 

Required: EM121, ES201, ME317
Electives: 16 credits
Not Allowed: EM104, ME123, EM103  

 

ME Minor for Physics students (26 credits total) 

Required: EM103, EM121, ES201, ME317
Electives: 12 credits
Not Allowed: EM104, ME123, EM103
Physics students must choose BE100 or CSSE120 or ME123 for their computing elective 

The mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,www.abet.org

Plan of Study

Freshman Open Close
Sophomore Open Close
Junior Open Close
Senior Open Close

Total credits required: 194

NOTES:

*Students must complete four foundational science classes, one in Biology (BIO101 or BIO110 or BIO120 or BIO130), two in Physics (PH111 and PH112), and one in Chemistry (CHEM111).  All foundational science classes have a laboratory component.  

**28 credit hours in electives composed of 16 credit hours in technical electives, 8 credit hours in free electives, and 4 credit hours of a math elective or a science elective.  A technical elective is any course (at the 200 level or above) in biomathematics, chemistry, computer science, engineering, engineering management, geology, mathematics, or physics that is not cross-listed with HSSA or similar in content to a required course.  A math elective is at the 200-level or higher and has an MA or BMTH prefix.  A science elective is any course in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics except those courses that are cross-listed with an engineering course.

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