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Alumnus Jack Farr Continues to be a Pioneer in Orthopedics

January 5, 2015

Farr Profile

Sports Medicine Leader: Jack Farr, a 1975 biological engineering graduate, is the founder of the Cartilage Restoration Center of Indiana, and his orthopedic research has been featured in more than 50 published articles and two books. (Photo provided)

Jack Farr, M.D., has a knack for being in the right place at the right time.

A stint in the emergency room while attending medical school sparked an interest in orthopedics, an interest that led to a 25-year career as a leader in sports medicine and cartilage restoration.

Farr, a 1975 biological engineering graduate, practices at Indiana Orthopedics Hospital (OrthoIndy) in Indianapolis, and has been recognized as one of central Indiana’s top orthopedic surgeons by Indianapolis Monthly magazine. He is also the founder of the Cartilage Restoration Center of Indiana, in conjunction with OrthoIndy’s Orthopedic Research Foundation, and his research has been featured in more than 50 published articles and two books.

“The science and mechanics behind orthopedics are just as complicated and involved as any other field of medicine,” he says.

In 1998, Farr was on the forefront of articular and meniscal cartilage restoration, and the process is now considered common practice for the millions receiving knee and hip replacements annually.

“When I got into neurology, I rapidly discovered that the field was largely about diagnosis and palliative treatment, rather than a curative solution,” he recalls. “In medical school, you are really only exposed to orthopedics for about two weeks out of four years. You really don’t get the sense of what orthopedics is.”

Farr earned his medical degree from Indiana University in 1979, and completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Indiana University Medical Center in 1986. He plans to continue making developments in the orthopedics field, and has no intention of hanging up his surgeon’s tools anytime soon.

“I have some relatively new projects that I would like to see to fruition, and one is going to take at least another five years, along with several ongoing research projects,” he says. “If something exciting comes up, I will sign on for that. That all commits me for multiple years to come.”

Farr was awarded an honorary degree from Rose-Hulman in 1999 and the Alumni Association’s Honor Alumni Award in 2014. He now lives in Bargersville, Indiana, with his wife, Sonja. They have two adult daughters, and Farr’s current hobbies include trying to keep up with his three grandchildren.